Aug 31st 2019

Politics this week

Politics this week

Boris Johnson, Britain’s prime minister, asked the queen to suspend Parliament soon after it returns on September 3rd. The move caught opposition parties, and many of Mr Johnson’s own Conservative MPs, off guard. The timing of the move, though perfectly legal, was designed to squeeze the already-tight timetable for MPs who want to block a no-deal Brexit. Parliament will …

Business this week

Business this week

A judge in Oklahoma ruled that Johnson & Johnson had broken the state’s “public nuisance” law with its aggressive marketing of opioids and ordered it to pay $572m. It was the first time a drugmaker had stood trial for its part in creating America’s opioid-addiction crisis; others have so far elected to settle rather than face a …

Populism | The corrupting of democracy

Populism | The corrupting of democracy

Cynicism is gnawing at Western democracies DEMOCRACIES ARE generally thought to die at the barrel of a gun, in coups and revolutions. These days, however, they are more likely to be strangled slowly in the name of the people. Take Hungary, where Fidesz, the ruling party, has used its parliamentary majority to capture regulators, dominate business, …

Horticulture | The foody benefits of farming vertically

Horticulture | The foody benefits of farming vertically

More variety, new and old tastes MANY FOODIES pin the blame for farming’s ills on “unnatural” industrial agriculture. Agribusinesses create monocultures that destroy habitat and eliminate historic varieties. Farmers douse their crops with fertiliser and insecticide, which poison streams and rivers—and possibly human beings. Intensive farms soak up scarce water and fly their produce around the …

The entanglement of powers | How Viktor Orban hollowed out Hungary’s democracy

The entanglement of powers | How Viktor Orban hollowed out Hungary’s democracy

His achievements are bad for Hungarian liberty—and an object lesson in what is possible for would-be autocrats elsewhere “A KING”, Bruce Springsteen has pointed out, “ain’t satisfied ‘til he rules everything.” It was to thwart this route to royal satisfaction that 18th-century thinkers such as Montesquieu and James Madison came to prize the separation of powers. If …